John C Taylor

The Chronophage


Dragon Chronophage


The Dragon Chronophage is the third Chronophage. From the shimmering scales of the Dragon to the polished gold of the clock face, it is a stunning object and at three metres tall, it dominates any room in which it is displayed.

I was delighted to collaborate with Professor Long of China Academy of Art, Hangzhou, to ensure the authenticity of the Chinese dragon. Coincidentally, the word ‘Long’ means Dragon in Chinese.

The Dragon's head

The Dragon’s head

Not only is the Dragon Chronophage a piece of art and a design icon, it is also a pioneering piece of technology. It is incredibly popular because it interacts with its audience, most of whom posed for a selfie!

The Dragon was exhibited in China at Design Shanghai, where it wowed and entertained the audience.

I wanted the Dragon to engage and play with the spectators, as with the others, so the Dragon winks, swishes its tail, rolls out a pearl and ripples its spine. I stopped short of making it breathe fire – only for health and safety reasons.

The Dragon's scales

The Dragon’s scales

Below is a brochure about the Dragon Chronophage.

We’ve also published the brochure in Chinese, which you will find here.

I was thrilled when the Isle of Man Post Office produced a wonderful set of postage stamps highlighting my life’s work and that one stamp shows both the Corpus Chronophage and the Dragon Chronophage.

Interesting Facts

Thousands of years ago in the Middle East, a random genetic mutation caused a group of grapes to spontaneously abort their own seeds before the seeds could develop hard casings. The result: seedless grapes. To reproduce the fruit, a farmer simply cloned the vine — meaning that all seedless grapes today are direct descendants of that one mutated grape vine.

Latest News

Luxury of Time Exhibition at National Museum of Scotland

A special display of rare and significant historical timepieces telling the story of a golden age of innovation in British watch and clockmaking will go on show at the National Museum of Scotland, Chambers Street, Edinburgh EH1 1JF, which runs to 26 January 2020. The Luxury of Time: Clocks from 1550-1750 features objects from the private collection of Dr John C Taylor OBE. The 25 objects to be shown demonstrate the golden age of British clock and watch-making and illustrate the delicate workmanship and incredible technical skills involved.  Exquisitely made and decorated in precious metals, they were labour-intensive, luxury items… read more

Interesting Quotes

To me, photography is an art of observation. It’s about finding something interesting in an ordinary place… I’ve found it has little to do with the things you see and everything to do with the way you see them.

Elliott Erwitt